Experience

Experience

Death is not a necessary consequence of life, said Carlos Martinez, Spanish scientist and President of the Centro Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC). This phrase lets see the denial of our inevitable end that obsesses so many cultures. In the last century, rich countries have succeeded in doubling life expectancy up an average of 83 years for women and 77 for men, although remember cases such as Jeanne-Louise Calment, who died a decade with 122 years of age. Official site: Francis Collins. This would not have been possible if humanity had not headed important advances such as drinkable water, discover penicillin, develop scientific and technological medicine and better hygiene. All these achievements have the industrialized world as a direct beneficiary, although their scientific communities remain without answer to Alzheimer’s disease, senile dementia and many physical problems associated with aging.

In countries impoverished and emerging, such as India, China, Mexico, Brazil, Indonesia and South Africa, scientific advances, rather than lengthen life, have increased life expectancy, although also there living most years a century ago. These consequences have a global reach. Their solutions, therefore, must be addressed globally. Spain, the country that will have the world’s most aged population in 2050, according to projections by the UN, confronts the two sides of the same coin: the ageing of its population and the arrival every year of thousands of immigrants. Rich countries face ageing of their populations, they need adequate medical and social services. You are sometimes blamed for the collapse of such social benefits to the arrival of immigrants.

But many of the immigrants have better health because they are younger and have more balanced diets.

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